Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer Prize

Top 11 Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer Prize Winners

Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer Prize

[Image Credit- Steve Sack, Minneapolis Star Tribune] “Student Debt” By 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winner, Steve Sack

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The winners of the Pulitzer Prize were announced last week. As artists and drawing enthusiasts, the team at Studio 602 was particularly anxious to see who won the Editorial Cartooning category. This year’s award went to cartoonist Steve Sack of the Star Tribune out of Minneapolis, MN.

The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning is awarded each year to, “A distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing and pictorial effect, published as a still drawing.”

Steve Sack has never shied away from controversial topics like the Iraq War, or gun control. In fact, most of his work is best described as political satire. Sack’s cartoons often poke fun at contemporary politics, its idiosyncrasies, and the politicians behind our most ludicrous current events.

You can read Steve’s nomination letter at the website for the Pulitzer Prize.

[VIDEO] Steve Sack’s Cartoon “Iraq Anniversary”

Also worth mentioning, the finalists in Editorial Cartooning for 2013 were Clay Bennett of the Chattanooga (Tenn.) Times Free Press and Jeff Darcy of The Plain Dealer. Both artists have created many memorable cartoons over recent years, and they’ll undoubtedly continue to produce more in the future. It must’ve been difficult to choose a winner this year with so many talented artists nominated for the prize.

Now, without further ado, Studio 602 presents our list of the top 11 Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer Prize winners.

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Top 11 Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer Prize Winners

1. David Horsey of The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Winner (2003) At the height of the Global War on Terror, David’s incisive, yet, poignant cartoons provided some necessary comic relief.

cartoon20020408

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Clay Bennett of The Christian Science Monitor, Winner (2002) Clay’s range is remarkable. He was able to make insightful cartoons inspired by more domestic economic woes as well as international issues.

DOT COM CRASH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Ann Telnaes of Tribune Media Services, Winner (2001) Quirky and colorful editorial cartoons with a punch are Ann’s specialty. See more of her work at Ann Telnaes‘s personal website.

Women's Vote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Nick Anderson of The Courier-Journal, Winner (2005) Smart, witty, and talented. Nick’s cartoons are fresh and relevant.

nick17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Matt Wuerker of POLITICO, Winner (2012) Matt’s work is not only dangerously smart, it’s also some of the funniest stuff out there right now.

wuerker11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Mark Fiore of SFGate, Winner (2010) Video Editorial Cartooning was probably not something that early Pulitzer juries would’ve anticipated. But Mark Fiore’s work is forward thinking, and ahead of its time, so how could they?

7. Walt Handelsman of The Times Picayune, Winner (1997) Walt covered the ups and downs of the Clinton era, various foreign affairs blunders, and gun control with wit and charm.

Welfare Reform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Stephen Breen of The Asbury Park Press, Winner (1998) From tabloids to the underhanded dealings of the tobacco industry, Stephen kept a watchful eye on the politics of the time.

Tabloids

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Joel Pett of The Lexington Herald-Leader, Winner (2000) Looking back, it seems that many of the issues of the early 2000′s have come full circle as seen in this cartoon by Joel Pett.

Gun Lobby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. Mike Keefe of The Denver Post, Winner (2011) Mike’s artwork is well illustrated and LOL hilarious. Check out this cartoon where he pokes fun at the Facebook generation.

Zuckerman Person of Year

11. Matt Davies of The Journal News, Winner (2004) Matt’s observations on the debt crisis as well as the drawn out wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are still relevant today.

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